Blog Archives

Auftragstaktik and fingerspitzengefühl

Two words: auftragstaktik and fingerspitzengefühl. To an English speaker, they might look kinda weird, but they’re key to getting an enterprise to work well… The terms originate from the German military, from around the early-19thC and mid-20thC respectively. They would translate approximately

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Posted in Business, Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Knowledge

Pervasives and the VSM algedonic link

How do we keep on track to enterprise purpose? Perhaps more to the point, how can we know when we’re falling off-track, in time to recover? To me, one of the keys here is the perhaps least-known part of the

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Posted in Business, Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Knowledge, Power and responsibility

Services and disservices – 6: Assessment and actions

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t – they either don’t work at all, or they serve someone else’s needs. Or desires. Or something of that kind, anyway. And therein lie a huge range of

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Posted in Business, Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Futures, Power and responsibility, Society

Services and disservices – 5: Social example

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t – they either don’t work at all, or they serve someone else’s needs. Or desires. Or something of that kind, anyway. And therein lie a huge range of

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Posted in Business, Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Futures, Power and responsibility, Society

Services and disservices – 5D: Social example (Implications for EA)

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t – they either don’t work at all, or they serve someone else’s needs. Or desires. Or something of that kind, anyway. And therein lie

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Posted in Business, Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Futures, Power and responsibility, Society

Services and disservices – 5C: Social example (Media-examples 6-9)

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t – they either don’t work at all, or they serve someone else’s needs. Or desires. Or something of that kind, anyway. And therein lie

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Posted in Business, Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Futures, Power and responsibility, Society

Services and disservices – 5B: Social example (Media-examples 1-5)

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t – they either don’t work at all, or they serve someone else’s needs. Or desires. Or something of that kind, anyway. And therein lie

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Posted in Business, Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Futures, Power and responsibility, Society

Services and disservices – 5A: Social example (Introduction)

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t – they either don’t work at all, or they serve someone else’s needs. Or desires. Or something of that kind, anyway. And therein lie

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Posted in Business, Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Futures, Power and responsibility, Society

Services and disservices – 4: Priority and privilege

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t – they either don’t work at all, or they serve someone else’s needs. Or desires. Or something of that kind, anyway. And therein lie

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Posted in Business, Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Futures, Power and responsibility, Society

Services and disservices – 3: The echo-chamber

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t. And therein lie a huge range of problems for enterprise-architects and many, many others… This is the third part of what should be a six-part series

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Posted in Business, Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Futures, Power and responsibility, Society
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