Tag: enterprise canvas

Services and disservices – 5C: Social example (Media-examples 6-9)

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t – they either don’t work at all, or they serve someone else’s needs. Or desires. Or something of that kind, anyway. And therein lie

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Services and disservices – 5B: Social example (Media-examples 1-5)

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t – they either don’t work at all, or they serve someone else’s needs. Or desires. Or something of that kind, anyway. And therein lie

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Services and disservices – 5A: Social example (Introduction)

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t – they either don’t work at all, or they serve someone else’s needs. Or desires. Or something of that kind, anyway. And therein lie

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Services and disservices – 4: Priority and privilege

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t – they either don’t work at all, or they serve someone else’s needs. Or desires. Or something of that kind, anyway. And therein lie

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Services and disservices – 3: The echo-chamber

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t. And therein lie a huge range of problems for enterprise-architects and many, many others… This is the third part of what should be a six-part series

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Services and disservices – 2: Education example

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t – sometimes through incompetence or failure in operation, sometimes through incompetence in service-design, and sometimes even by intent. And therein lie a huge range of problems

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Services and disservices – 1: Introduction

Services serve: they serve the needs of someone, or, in a broader ecosystem, the needs of something. Services serve – that’s why they’re called ‘services’. Yet what do we call something that purports to serve some need, but doesn’t? I’d suggest

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What’s the scope of a business-model?

I’ve long been a fan of Alex Osterwalder’s work. There can be no doubt that he’s had a huge impact on business-architecture – particularly for startups – with tools such as his Business Model Canvas  [BMCanvas] and, more recently, Value

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A tagline for enterprise-effectiveness

What’s a simple tagline that we can use to help guide conversations about enhancing of enterprise-effectiveness? My own preference is this: things work better when they work together, on purpose. Okay, I’ll admit that that doesn’t quite give us the full

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Effectiveness for enterprise-effectiveness

Keep it simple. Simple, yet not simplistic. Acknowledge the complexity, yet don’t ever push that complexity in people’s faces. (Not until they’re ready for it and choose to face it, anyway.) Help people find their own effectiveness about creating effectiveness.

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