Blog Archives

Auftragstaktik and fingerspitzengefühl

Two words: auftragstaktik and fingerspitzengefühl. To an English speaker, they might look kinda weird, but they’re key to getting an enterprise to work well… The terms originate from the German military, from around the early-19thC and mid-20thC respectively. They would translate approximately

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Learning and the limits of automation

One of the themes that came up in the Vlerick Business School session on EA-roadmaps was around how long it takes to learn how to develop the skills needed to do enterprise-architecture – and how and why to learn them,

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Reflecting on EA Masterclass

Back in England after my ‘EA Masterclass’ series in Australia, seems it might be useful to reflect a bit on where this ‘whole-of-enterprise’ approach to enterprise-architecture is going. So let’s reiterate a bit, because yes, it’s different from what we might

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Anecdotes and government-policy

It started out as a comment on satire, but quietly explores some much more serious themes: this particular Twitter back-and-forth between Stephen Bounds and Shawn Callahan (via his Anecdote persona) is another one that definitely deserves a more permanent place! It

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Michael Margolis on story (and business)

What is story? Perhaps more to the point, why story? This was another item that whipped by on the Twitterstream that I felt needed to be kept somewhere somewhat more permanent – a stream of comments on story and the nature

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NOTES – actors, agents and extras in the enterprise

If the enterprise is a story, who are the actors in that story? What are their drivers and needs? How do we model and manage the relationships between those actors in the story? (This is part of an overview and

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Some notes on NOTES

What is a narrative-oriented approach to enterprise-transformation? Why use it, and where, and how? And where did all this NOTES stuff come from, anyway? NOTES is, I admit, a somewhat-forced acronym for a way to look at business-change: Narrative-Oriented Transformation of Enterprise

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NOTES – putting it into practice

How do we use an narrative approach in enterprise-transformation? What’s different about it, in real-world practice? How does it work? In the first post in this series, I introduced the core ideas for NOTES – Narrative-Oriented Transformation of Enterprise (and)

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NOTES – an alternative approach for EA

If – as we’re often told – business-design is about the relationships between people, process and technology, what is it that links all of themes together? Answer: a story. Okay, yes, this is a theme I’ve explored a lot here on

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The over-certainties of certification

A strange kind of annual ritual that they did there, that subtle ‘work-to-rule’, every year that I worked at that place. Each autumn, up would come the new crop of graduates, each with their shiny new graduation-certificate and their own

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