Blog Archives

The future of work, and money

Seems lots of people these days are writing about ‘the future of work’ – and even putting some of that thinking into practice, too. But is that thinking going anything like deep enough? Hmm… – not sure about that… So

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Posted in Business, Enterprise architecture, Futures, Society

Hoist by their own petard (again)

It’s another of those times where I don’t quite know whether to laugh, cry, be incensed, or what, so I guess I’ll have to settle for somewhere in between… This morning’s email brings me the usual guff from the mainstream

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Posted in Business, Enterprise architecture, Futures

On modelling ‘self-service’ with Archimate

In enterprise-architecture, how should you describe or model ‘self-service’ – in which the customer, rather than the organisation’s employee, uses the organisation’s systems to place an order, or search for information? The classic way of looking at this is from

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Posted in Business, Enterprise architecture

More on theory and metatheory in EA

“Yes, we need theory in enterprise-architecture”, people will often say to me, “but which theory should it be? Should it be quantitative, everything defined in terms of metrics? Or should it be qualitative, and forget about metrics entirely? Which one

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Posted in Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture

Theory and metatheory in enterprise-architecture

What’s the role of theory in enterprise-architecture? Could there be such as thing as ‘the theory of enterprise-architecture’? Can we use that theory, for example, to separate useful EA models from useless ones? It seems that Nick Malik thinks so, as per

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Posted in Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture

The point of specialism

What’s the point of specialism? Or, perhaps more to the point, why do we so much argue about ‘the point’? – is it a side-effect of specialism itself? After the farrago around the last couple of posts here, this is perhaps best described

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Posted in Enterprise architecture, Knowledge

More on trolls, specialism and context

In the old Norse children’s tale, there’s a troll that lives under a bridge, that eats the life-force of anyone who tries to pass. It’s a useful bridge, sure, and it’s easiest to pass that way, if the troll wasn’t

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Posted in Enterprise architecture, Knowledge

The dangers of specialism-trolls in enterprise-architecture

As cross-domain generalists, how can we best cope with narrow-focus specialists who insist that their own domain is the only one that matters? This is a constant problem in enterprise-architectures and the like, not least because we somehow have to

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Posted in Enterprise architecture, Knowledge

RBPEA: Wrapping up on gender

In what ways can we use explorations at the RBPEA (Really-Big-Picture Enterprise-Architecture) scope and scale to create insights for practical use in everyday-level enterprise-architectures? For example – in the specific case of this blog-series – what can we learn from

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Posted in Business, Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Futures, Power and responsibility, Society

RBPEA: An anticlient’s tale

How does someone become an anticlient – a person who’s committed to the same aims of the same shared-enterprise, but vehemently disagrees with how you or your organisation are acting within it? And, since anticlient-actions can actually kill the entire

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Posted in Business, Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Futures, Power and responsibility, Society
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