Blog Archives

Employees as customers of HR

What is the proper – or most effective – relationship between the so-called ‘Human Resources’ department and the employees of an organisation? (Okay, I admit it, I’ve allowed myself to get somewhat distracted from finishing the promised assessment of use

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Posted in Business, Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Power and responsibility

NOTES – actors, agents and extras in the enterprise

If the enterprise is a story, who are the actors in that story? What are their drivers and needs? How do we model and manage the relationships between those actors in the story? (This is part of an overview and

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Posted in Business, Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Knowledge, Power and responsibility

Some notes on NOTES

What is a narrative-oriented approach to enterprise-transformation? Why use it, and where, and how? And where did all this NOTES stuff come from, anyway? NOTES is, I admit, a somewhat-forced acronym for a way to look at business-change: Narrative-Oriented Transformation of Enterprise

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Posted in Business, Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Knowledge, Power and responsibility

NOTES – putting it into practice

How do we use an narrative approach in enterprise-transformation? What’s different about it, in real-world practice? How does it work? In the first post in this series, I introduced the core ideas for NOTES – Narrative-Oriented Transformation of Enterprise (and)

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Posted in Business, Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Knowledge, Power and responsibility

NOTES – an alternative approach for EA

If – as we’re often told – business-design is about the relationships between people, process and technology, what is it that links all of themes together? Answer: a story. Okay, yes, this is a theme I’ve explored a lot here on

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Posted in Business, Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Knowledge, Power and responsibility

Four principles for a sane society: an addendum

What architectures do we need for a society and economics that’d be viable and sustainable over the longer term? And how do we scale that down to the the everyday work we do at present in enterprise-architectures and the like?

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Posted in Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Futures, Power and responsibility, Society

Four principles for a sane society: Summary

How do we make sense of the big-picture in enterprise-architecture? The really big-picture? For those who didn’t (or couldn’t!) read the full series, here’s a (shortish) summary of each of those (rather over-long) posts… From the Introduction Part of the work I’ve been

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Posted in Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Futures, Power and responsibility, Society

Four principles – 4: Adaptability is everything

How do we work with change – and, especially, extreme-change – in an enterprise-architecture? At the really big-picture scale? This is the fifth in a series of posts on principles for a sane society: Four principles for a sane society: Introduction Four principles: #1:

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Posted in Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Futures, Power and responsibility, Society

Four principles – 3: Money doesn’t matter

What’s the real role of money within design for an enterprise-architecture? At the really big-picture scale? [Apologies, folks: this one’s turned out to be really long, even by my usual standards – but unfortunately this theme is so darn controversial that it really does need the

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Posted in Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Futures, Power and responsibility, Society

Four principles – 2: There are no rights

What rights do we need to design for in enterprise-architecture? At the really big-picture scale? This is the third in a series of posts on principles for a sane society: Four principles for a sane society: Introduction Four principles: #1: There are no rules

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Posted in Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Futures, Power and responsibility, Society
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