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Services and disservices – 5B: Social example (Media-examples 1-5)

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t – they either don’t work at all, or they serve someone else’s needs. Or desires. Or something of that kind, anyway. And therein lie

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Services and disservices – 5A: Social example (Introduction)

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t – they either don’t work at all, or they serve someone else’s needs. Or desires. Or something of that kind, anyway. And therein lie

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Services and disservices – 4: Priority and privilege

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t – they either don’t work at all, or they serve someone else’s needs. Or desires. Or something of that kind, anyway. And therein lie

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Services and disservices – 3: The echo-chamber

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t. And therein lie a huge range of problems for enterprise-architects and many, many others… This is the third part of what should be a six-part series

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Services and disservices – 2: Education example

Services serve the needs of someone. Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t – sometimes through incompetence or failure in operation, sometimes through incompetence in service-design, and sometimes even by intent. And therein lie a huge range of problems

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Services and disservices – 1: Introduction

Services serve: they serve the needs of someone, or, in a broader ecosystem, the needs of something. Services serve – that’s why they’re called ‘services’. Yet what do we call something that purports to serve some need, but doesn’t? I’d suggest

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Idea-parenting

I’d often wondered why I always seem to have such a visceral response to hearing a woman say “I don’t work, I’m only a mother”. What do you mean by “only”? – why would anyone deride it so? And what do

Posted in Complexity / Structure, Futures, Power and responsibility, Society, The Outsider Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

RBPEA: Wrapping up on gender

In what ways can we use explorations at the RBPEA (Really-Big-Picture Enterprise-Architecture) scope and scale to create insights for practical use in everyday-level enterprise-architectures? For example – in the specific case of this blog-series – what can we learn from

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RBPEA: An anticlient’s tale

How does someone become an anticlient – a person who’s committed to the same aims of the same shared-enterprise, but vehemently disagrees with how you or your organisation are acting within it? And, since anticlient-actions can actually kill the entire

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RBPEA: On abuse and gender

What is abuse, or violence? How do we prevent it, or at least reduce it? And to what extent, and in what ways, is gender a contributing factor in any of this? In line with the theme of this blog-series, in

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