Services and disservices – 5: Social example

Services serve the needs of someone.

Disservices purport to serve the needs of someone, but don’t – they either don’t work at all, or they serve someone else’s needs. Or desires. Or something of that kind, anyway.

And therein lie a huge range of problems for enterprise-architects and many, many others…

This is the fifth part of what should be a six-part series on services and disservices, and what to do about the latter to (we hope) make them more into the former:

(This part of the series – Part 5 – ended up being far larger than expected (some 12,000 words), so it’s been split into four subsections, as distinct posts for Parts 5A to 5D, as in the list above. This post is just a placeholder to provide a single place to link together those four subsections: use the links above to go to the respective post.)

Posted in Business, Complexity / Structure, Enterprise architecture, Futures, Power and responsibility, Society Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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